Volume 10 Supplement 2

Proceedings of the Avian Genomics Conference and Gene Ontology Annotation Workshop

Open Access

Integrative sequence and tissue expression profiling of chicken and mammalian aquaporins

  • Raphael D Isokpehi1Email author,
  • Rajendram V Rajnarayanan2,
  • Cynthia D Jeffries1,
  • Tolulola O Oyeleye1 and
  • Hari HP Cohly1
BMC Genomics200910(Suppl 2):S7

DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-10-S2-S7

Published: 14 July 2009

Abstract

Background

Proteins that selectively transport water across the membranes of cells are recognized as important in the normal functioning of the body systems of vertebrates. There are 13 known mammalian aquaporins (AQP0 to AQP12), some of which have been shown to have unexpected cellular roles beyond transmembrane water transport. The availability of non-mammalian vertebrate animal models has the potential to provide insight into the emergence of diverse function in the aquaporins. The domesticated chicken (Gallus gallus) is the premier avian model for biological research; however, only a limited number of studies have compared chicken and mammalian aquaporins. The identification of aquaporins that share functional motifs or are expressed in the same tissues in human and chicken could allow the further functional analyses of homologous aquaporins in both species. We hypothesize that integrative analyses of protein sequences and body site expression of human, mouse, rat and chicken aquaporins has the potential to yield novel biological hypotheses about the unexpected cellular roles of aquaporins beyond transmembrane water transport.

Results

A total of 76 aquaporin transcript models derived from 47 aquaporin genes were obtained for human, mouse, rat and chicken. Eleven body sites (brain, connective tissue, head, heart, liver, muscle, ovary, pancreas, small intestine, spleen and testis) were identified in which there is suggested expression of at least one mammalian and one chicken aquaporin. This study demonstrates that modern on-line analysis tools, a novel matrix integration technique, and the availability of the chicken genome for comparative genomics and expression analysis enables hypothesis generation in several important areas including: (i) alternative transcription and speciation effects on the conservation of functional motifs in vertebrate aquaporins; (ii) the emergence of basolateral targeting in mammalian species; (iii) the potential of the cysteine-rich AQP11 as a possible target in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders such as autism that involve Purkinje cells; and (iv) possible impairment of function of pancreas-expressed AQP12 during pancreatotropic necrosis in avian influenza virus infection.

Conclusion

The investigation of aquaporin function in chicken and mammalian species has the potential to accelerate the discovery of novel knowledge of aquaporins in both avian and mammalian species.

Background

Proteins that selectively transport water across the membranes of cells are recognized as important in normal functioning of the body systems of vertebrates. These homologous proteins are collectively referred to as aquaporins and include a subset called aquaglyceroporins that are able to transport glycerol, urea and other small solutes in addition to water [1]. There are 13 known mammalian aquaporins (AQP0 to AQP12). These aquaporins vary in tissue and developmental expression across mammalian species and unexpected cellular roles for the aquaporins beyond transmembrane water transport have been identified [2]. However, the cellular and molecular strategies for these roles are not completely understood. The water-only aquaporins are AQP0, AQP1, AQP2, AQP4, AQP5, AQP6 and AQP8, while aquaglyceroporins are AQP3, AQP7, AQP9 and AQP10 [1]. The transport specificities and roles of AQP11 and AQP12 in health and disease are not completely described [1, 35]. Aquaporins typically have six transmembrane regions and five loops (A to E) with two characteristic Asparagine-Proline-Alanine (NPA) motifs in loops B and E (Figure 1) [6]. Based on the number of citations in PubMed, avian aquaporins have been poorly investigated compared to those of human, mouse and rat [7].
https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2164-10-S2-S7/MediaObjects/12864_2009_Article_2555_Fig1_HTML.jpg
Figure 1

Topology of an aquaporin protein within the membrane. The protein consists of six transmembrane helices (I-VI) connected by five loops (A-E) and includes two internal tandem repeats (I-III and IV-VI, respectively). Loops B and E, containing the conserved NPA motifs (in the single-letter amino-acid code), form short α helices that fold back into the membrane from opposite sides. C, carboxyl terminus; N, amino terminus. Figure reproduced from [6].

The domesticated chicken Gallus gallus is the premier avian model for biological research [810]. Furthermore, the publication of the chicken genome and availability of large-scale gene expression data presents new opportunities to compare the expression of avian and mammalian aquaporin genes. Mammalian aquaporins function in diverse biological processes including development of lens, inner ear, teeth and oral facial tissues; maintenance of sperm motility; synthesis and secretion of milk; and urine concentration. In addition, malfunction of mammalian aquaporins have been implicated in diverse disease processes such as altered fat metabolism, brain edema, cancer, congenital cataract, dry mouth, dry skin, infertility, hearing loss, nephrogenic diabetes, renal failure, and wet lung syndrome [11]. This broad range of pathologies linked to altered aquaporin expression has further supported the potential of aquaporins as drug targets for water-transport related disorders [12].

Apart from transmembrane/epithelial water transport, recently suggested unexpected cellular roles of mammalian aquaporins include cell migration, cell volume regulation, mitochondria metabolism, neural signal transduction, renal glycerol clearance and vesicular swelling [11, 13]. The co-expression of several members of the aquaporin gene family in the same tissue such as small intestine [14] makes it difficult to determine their individual role apart from trans-epithelial water transport. It is not clear whether alternative transcription/splicing of an aquaporin gene to produce more than one isoform contributes to these unexpected cellular roles. Mice with deficient or mutated aquaporin are currently used as models to study novel cellular roles of human aquaporins [11]. There is an increasing need to have alternative non-mammalian models for aquaporin function in humans [14]. The chick optic tectum has been used to investigate the role of AQP4 in blood brain barrier development [15]. Furthermore, in chick lens development, AQP0 interacts with lens-fiber gap junctions during lens development [16].

There are a limited numbers of reports that have compared the body site expression of chicken and mammalian aquaporins. Comparison of nucleotide sequences of chicken AQP2, AQP4 and AQP5 to their rat and human orthologs has revealed an overall identity of 75–90% and similarity in tissue distribution [7]. AQP9 has not been shown to be expressed in mammalian kidney, but recently found expressed in young chicken kidney [17]. In addition, water-deprivation in early development of rodents and chicken results in upregulation of the kidney AQP2 [17, 18]. The distribution of AQP4 in the circumventricular organs of chicken and rat brains have been compared [19]. Taken together, the identification of aquaporins that share sequence similarity or are expressed in identical tissues in human and chicken could allow the further functional analyses of aquaporins in avian species.

The objectives of the investigation reported in this article were to (1) determine the impact of alternative transcription and speciation on functional motifs of aquaporin gene transcript models predicted from the genomes of human, mouse, rat and chicken; and (2) determine body sites common to human, mouse, rat and chicken with suggested aquaporin expression. We hypothesize that integrative analyses of protein sequences and body site expression of human, mouse, rat and chicken aquaporins has the potential to yield novel biological hypotheses about the unexpected cellular roles of aquaporins beyond transmembrane water transport. Our high-throughput comparative sequence analysis revealed the potential impact of alternative transcription and speciation on the conservation of functional motifs in human, mouse, rat and chicken aquaporins. Furthermore, by using controlled vocabulary of terms describing body sites in the UniGene database, an integrated view of suggested tissue expression of aquaporins for these four organisms was generated.

The integrative analyses of protein sequences and tissue expression profiles presented in this article provides novel insights into the potential function of cysteine-rich AQP11 in the pathophysiology of autism and evidence for involvement of pancreas-expressed AQP12 in the pathology of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infections. The investigation of aquaporin function in chicken could accelerate the discovery of novel knowledge on human aquaporins especially during early development.

Results

Comparison of predicted aquaporin transcripts from human, mouse, rat and chicken

In order to determine the impact of alternative transcription as well as speciation on the conservation of functional motifs in aquaporins, we first compiled the aquaporin types with entries in the Entrez Gene [20] and Ensembl [21] genomic resources (Table 1) for human, mouse, rat and chicken. This dataset provided the basis for comparative sequence analysis of the transcripts predicted in the Ensembl genome resource. Multiple sequence alignment was performed on each aquaporin type in which at least one mammalian and one chicken transcript were available. A total of 76 sequences were retrieved from the Ensembl. Multiple sequence alignments for each aquaporin type are available as Additional File 1. A summary of the number of transcripts examined for 9 aquaporin types and key observations from sequence alignment are presented in Table 2. The impact of alternative transcription and speciation of these vertebrate aquaporins on the conservation of the two water-transport motifs is summarized in Table 3. We further describe below the results obtained for AQP3, AQP4, AQP11 and AQP12.
Table 1

Aquaporin entries in Entrez Gene, UniGene, and Ensembl genomic resources

AQP

Human

Mouse

Rat

Chicken

 

Entrez Gene

Unigene

Ensembl*

Entrez Gene

Unigene

Ensembl*

Entrez Gene

Unigene

Ensembl*

Entrez Gene

Unigene

Ensembl*

AQP 0

4284

Hs.574026

135517

17339

Mm.31625

25389

25480

Rn.23532

3132

374124

Gga.67

-

AQP 1

358

Hs.76152

106125

11826

Mm.18625

4655

25240

Rn.1618

11648

420384

Gga.2680

5209

AQP 2

359

Hs.130730

167580

11827

Mm.20206

23013

25386

Rn.90076

297

-

-

-

AQP 3

360

Hs.234642

165272

11828

Mm.34043

28435

65133

Rn.11109

9797

426894

Gga.23800

2452

AQP 4

361

Hs.315369

171885

11829

Mm.250786

24411

25293

Rn.90091

16043

421088

Gga.11374

15128

AQP 5

362

Hs.298023

161798

11830

Mm.45580

44217

25241

Rn.10066

17685

431305

Gga.6412

2720

AQP 6

363

Hs.54505

86159

11831

Mm.202309

43144

29170

Rn.48667

296

-

-

10260

AQP 7

364

Hs.455323

165269

11832

Mm.8728

28427

29171

Rn.11111

9686

426892

Gga.21944

18534

AQP 8

343

Hs.176658

103375

11833

Mm.273175

30762

29172

Rn.6315

14652

416566

Gga.6178

5988

AQP 9

366

Hs.104624

103569

64008

Mm.335570

32204

65054

Rn.30018

15949

415402

Gga.12485

4261

AQP 10

89872

Hs.259048

143595

435743

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

AQP 11

282679

Hs.503345

178301

66333

Mm.29756

42797

286758

Rn.20144

13358

426725

Gga.8876

1614

AQP 12

375318

Hs.437167

184945

208760

Mm.235537

45091

367316

Rn.20532

4452

424861

Gga.19694

6436

*Ensembl Identifiers obtained had a total of 11 numerals with the appropriate number of zeros as padding. Furthermore, the identifiers were preceded by ENSG, ENSMUSG, ENSRNOG, and ENSGAL are for human, mouse, rat and chicken genes respectively. The isoform of Human AQP12 used for analysis was Aquaporin 12B.

Table 2

Aquaporin isoforms examined for each aquaporin type and key observations from comparative sequence analysis*

AQP Type

Organism

Observations from sequence alignment

 

Human

Mouse

Rat

Chicken

 

AQP1

2

1

1

1

Human transcript ENST00000265298 lacked the first 94 amino acids of ENST00000311813 which is present in the AQP1 from mouse, rat and chicken. This N-terminal region of the sequence contained the first NPA motif. However, the second NPA motif starting at position 192 in ENST00000311813 is conserved in all the 5 protein sequences

AQP3

3

1

1

1

Human transcript ENST00000379492 lacked the first 34 amino acids present in the other isoforms.

AQP4

3

2

2

2

All the organisms had multiple transcripts.

AQP5

1

2

2

3

The first NPA motif was observed in all the protein sequences. Two chicken transcripts ENSGALT00000041244 and ENSGALT00000041246 and two rodent transcripts ENSMUST00000088200 and ENSRNOT00000040874 produced isoforms that lacked the second NPA motif.

AQP7

4

3

1

1

All nine protein sequences of AQP7 contained atypical water transport NPA motifs. The first motif is NAA while the second motif was NPS.

AQP8

1

2

1

1

The first water-transport motif for chicken AQP8 was NPV

AQP9

1

4

1

2

Except for mouse transcript ENSMUST00000113569, all other AQP9 protein sequences had the second NPA motif.

AQP11

1

2

2

1

The first water transporting motif was atypical (NPC) in all the isoforms examined. Only three protein isoforms from transcripts ENSRNOT00000018091, ENSMUST00000084986 and ENST00000313578 contained the second NPA motif.

AQP12

2

1

1

1

Human transcript ENST00000373309 lacked the first NPA-like motif (NPT) present in the other sequences.

*Additional File 1 contains the multiple sequence alignment for AQP0 to AQP12. Ensembl Identifiers preceded by ENST, ENSMUST, ENSRNOT, and ENSGALT are for human, mouse, rat and chicken transcripts respectively.

Table 3

Prioritize aquaporin isoforms for investigation for roles other than water-transport

Aquaporin

Organism

Ensembl ID

Missing NPA or NPA-like motif

AQP1

Human

ENST00000265298

First

AQP3

Human

ENST00000343952

Second

AQP3

Human

ENST00000379492

Second

AQP4

Human

ENST00000339532

First

AQP4

Human

ENST00000383170

Second

AQP5

Mouse

ENSMUST00000088200

Second

AQP5

Rat

ENSRNOT00000040874

Second

AQP5

Chicken

ENSGALT00000041244

Second

AQP5

Chicken

ENSGALT00000041246

Second

AQP9

Mouse

ENSMUST00000113569

Second

AQP12

Human

ENST00000373309

First

Three human transcripts were retrieved for AQP3 and one each for mouse, rat and chicken from the Ensembl (Figure 2). The protein isoform from human AQP3 transcript ENST00000379492 lacked the first 34 amino acids present in the other isoforms. This region contained the YRLL motif known to be important for basolateral sorting in epithelial cells [2224]. The YRLL motif was replaced by a NKLV motif in the only chicken isoform obtained from transcript ENSGALT00000003868. The first NPA motif was conserved in all the AQP3 isoforms while the second NPA motif was absent in two human AQP3 isoform sequences (ENST00000343952 and ENST00000379492). The impact of alternative transcription and speciation is illustrated by protein features predicted for the three human AQP3 transcripts and one chicken AQP transcript (Figure 3). Note the difference in number of transmembrane helices predicted for the human transcripts. Interestingly, the chicken transcript lacks a prediction for signal peptide. This observation led us to further analyze the Ensembl generated pairwise sequence alignments of the chicken AQP3 with other vertebrate AQP3 showing 1-to-1 ortholog prediction. The AQP3 (ENSOANG00000014661) of the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) had a YKLL motif aligned to the NKLV motif of the chicken sequence (Figure 4).
https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2164-10-S2-S7/MediaObjects/12864_2009_Article_2555_Fig2_HTML.jpg
Figure 2

ClustalW multiple sequence alignment of AQP3 protein isoforms predicted by the Ensembl software system. Position 19 to 22 contains the YRLL motif for basolateral targeting. This motif is replaced in chicken AQP3 with NKLV.

https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2164-10-S2-S7/MediaObjects/12864_2009_Article_2555_Fig3_HTML.jpg
Figure 3

Impact of alternative transcription and speciation on protein features of AQP3 isoforms. There are differences in the predicted protein features of AQP3 isoforms obtained from human and chicken gene loci. In the chicken homolog, no signal peptide cleavage predicted. Images were obtained from Ensembl gene information pages. HGNC is abbreviation for Human Genome Nomenclature Committee.

https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2164-10-S2-S7/MediaObjects/12864_2009_Article_2555_Fig4_HTML.jpg
Figure 4

Multiple sequence alignment of AQP3 sequences from selected vertebrates. The platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus), a beaked mammal whose females lay eggs, had an YKLL motif aligned to the NKLV motif of the chicken sequence.

AQP4 was the only aquaporin type in which the four organisms had at least two transcripts. Multiple sequence alignment of the amino acid sequences from the 9 transcripts and construction of phylogenetic tree revealed two classes of transcripts (Figure 5). The two rat transcripts (ENSRNOT00000048109 and ENSRNOT00000021961) clustered with a human transcript (ENST00000383170) and a mouse transcript (ENSMUST00000079081). In the case of the remaining 5 AQP4 transcripts, the chicken and mouse protein sequences were clustered with human transcript ENST00000339532.
https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2164-10-S2-S7/MediaObjects/12864_2009_Article_2555_Fig5_HTML.jpg
Figure 5

Phylogenetic tree of AQP4 protein sequences from human (H), mouse (M), rat (R) and chicken (C). The symbols and their corresponding Ensembl transcripts in brackets are: AQP4_C_T1 (ENSGALT00000024413); AQP4_C_T2 (ENSGALT00000036809); AQP4_M_T1 (ENSMUST00000079081); AQP4_M_T2 (ENSMUST00000115856); AQP4_R_T1 (ENSRNOT00000021961); AQP4_R_T2 (ENSRNOT00000048109); AQP4_H_T1 (ENST00000339532); AQP4_H_T2 (ENST00000383168); AQP4_H_T3 (ENST00000383170).

In the case of AQP11, the first water transporting motif was atypical (NPC) in all the isoforms examined. Only three protein isoforms from transcripts ENSRNOT00000018091, ENSMUST00000084986 and ENST00000313578 contained the second NPA motif. AQP11 sequences had a high number of cysteine residues compared to other aquaporin types including a triplet CCC present in the N-terminal of protein sequences produced by transcripts ENSMUST00000055379, ENSMUST00000084986 and ENST00000313578. The two rat sequences had a CYC motif while chicken had a CAC motif. Cysteine residues are known to interact with sulfhydryl-reactive metals such as mercury, cadmium, lead, and arsenic [25]. A total of five transcripts for AQP12 were retrieved for the four species. The protein sequence for one of the human transcripts (ENST00000373309) lacked the first NPA-like motif (NPT) present in the other sequences. All contained the second NPA motif.

Body site expression profiles for human, mouse, rat and chicken aquaporins

A total of 44 UniGene aquaporin entries from human (13), mouse (12), rat (10) and chicken (9) were identified has having suggested expression in at least one of 57 body sites based on Expressed Sequence Tags (EST) counts (Table 4). A total of 51 binary signatures described the expression of aquaporins from the organisms compared. The visualized matrix of signatures is presented in Figure 6. Furthermore, 11 body sites (brain, connective tissue, head, heart, liver, muscle, ovary, pancreas, small intestine, spleen and testis) were identified in which both chicken and mammalian aquaporins were expressed. The brain had the highest count for aquaporin expression. All four organisms expressed AQP1, AQP4 and AQP11 in the brain. There was evidence of expression of AQP12 in the intestine, pancreas, stomach, and tongue as well as expression in the pancreas for all species except rat (Figure 6, Additional file 2). We mapped chicken aquaporins to body sites in order to prioritize them for further functional analysis (Table 5).
Table 4

Controlled UniGene body site terms associated with expressed aquaporins from human, mouse, rat and chicken

Body Site

AQP Count

Body Site

AQP Count

Body Site

AQP Count

Body Site

AQP Count

Adipose tissue

5

Extraembryonic tissue

3

Muscle

14

Spleen

6

Adrenal gland

4

Eye

19

Nasopharynx

3

Stomach

10

Ascites

1

Fertilized ovum

1

Nerve

2

Testis

15

Bladder

6

Head

3

Ovary

10

Thymus

8

Blood

3

Heart

10

Pancreas

11

Thyroid

6

Bone

4

Inner ear

3

Parathyroid

2

Tongue

3

Bone marrow

5

Intestine

13

Pharynx

2

Trachea

2

Brain

23

Joint

3

Pineal gland

2

Umbilical cord

2

Cervix

3

Kidney

21

Pituitary gland

2

Uterus

9

Colon

2

Larynx

4

Placenta

8

Vagina

2

Connective tissue

12

Liver

15

Prostate

10

Vascular

3

Dorsal root ganglion

1

Lung

14

Salivary gland

4

Vibrissa

1

Embryonic tissue

12

Lymph node

1

Skin

8

  

Epididymis

1

Mammary gland

10

Small intestine

2

  

Esophagus

2

Mouth

2

Spinal cord

2

  
Table 5

Body sites and corresponding expressed chicken aquaporins that could be used as models for understanding mammalian aquaporins

Aquaporin Type

Chicken UniGene ID

Body Site

AQP0

Gga.67

Head

AQP1

Gga.2680

Brain, Connective Tissue, Head, Heart, Liver, Muscle, Ovary, Spleen

AQP3

Gga.23800

Head, Liver, Ovary

AQP4

Gga.11374

Brain, Muscle

AQP5

Gga.6412

Pancreas

AQP7

Gga.21944

Testis

AQP9

Gga.12485

Heart, Liver, Muscle

AQP11

Gga.8876

Brain, Liver, Muscle, Small Intestine

AQP12

Gga.19694

Pancreas

https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2164-10-S2-S7/MediaObjects/12864_2009_Article_2555_Fig6_HTML.jpg
Figure 6

Visualization of comparison of suggested body site expression of UniGene data for human (h), mouse (m), rat (r), and chicken (c) aquaporins. Each aquaporin type is represented by 4 boxes corresponding to the four-digit binary number. Red box indicate presence of expression (1) while green box indicate absence of expression (0).

Discussion

Aquaporin cell surface proteins are emerging as important proteins beyond water transport [2, 11, 13, 26]. However, the molecular, cellular and evolutionary basis for these novel roles are not completely known. Our high-throughput comparative sequence analysis revealed the impact of alternative transcription and speciation on the conservation of functional motifs in human, mouse, rat and chicken aquaporins. Furthermore, by using a controlled vocabulary of terms describing body sites in the UniGene database, an integrated view of suggested tissue expression of aquaporins in these four organisms was generated (Figure 6). We were unable to retrieve information from the Ensembl database on chicken AQP2 and AQP0 (Entrez Gene ID: 374124) although chicken AQP0 (MIP) has been studied in the context of early development of lens fiber and its association with gap junction proteins [16]. The predicted chicken AQP6 was annotated as AQP2-like. The annotation of AQP0, AQP2 and AQP6 from the chicken genome warrants further investigation.

Alternate splicing of mRNA as a means of generating protein diversity can occur by exon skipping [27]. All the 76 aquaporins transcripts analyzed were multi-exon transcripts and could be subject to alternative splicing with impact on protein function. For the nine aquaporin types compared, our sequence alignments uncovered aquaporin isoforms that lacked one of the two water-transport motifs (Table 3). We hypothesize that isoforms lacking one of the two NPA or NPA-like motifs characteristic will have impaired or abolished water transport function. They are also candidates for investigating roles other than water function. Another mechanism for variation that can impact function of aquaporins is single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Previous work has demonstrated that novel genetic variants of AQP4 resulting from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) showed reduced water permeability [28]. We observed from the Ensembl database (Release 50 July 2008) that a total of 19 reference SNPs were mapped to the following chicken aquaporins: AQP1, AQP7, AQP8, AQP9 and AQP12. As the chicken genome become further characterized for polymorphisms, it may become possible to gain insights into impact of SNP variation on aquaporin function and organism phenotype.

Most proteins that target the plasma membrane contain signals within their cytoplasmic termini that permit their recruitment into endocytic vesicles, which in turn facilitates their selective compartmentalization in the apical or basolateral membranes selectively [23]. We were interested in identifying avian protein isoforms in which the functional motifs were different from mammalian aquaporin isoforms. We have previously investigated the compartmentalization of AQP3 and AQP10 in the human intestine in which we observed that the basolateral sorting motif "YRLL" is present in AQP3 but absent in AQP10 [22]. Based on the UniGene suggested expression profiles there was no suggestion for the expression of chicken AQP3 in the intestine. Furthermore, the signal peptide for targeting was not predicted for chicken AQP3 in the Ensembl resource (Figure 3). Tissue expression for this chicken AQP3 was suggested for head, liver, and ovary. Comparative sequence analysis provided evidence that chicken AQP3 lacks the YRLL motif (NKLV was observed) suggesting that it may not be targeted to the basolateral membrane of the intestine. The multiple sequence alignment of the AQP3 protein sequences from the four organisms revealed that the amino acids immediately before and after the YRLL and NKLV motifs were conserved (Figure 2).

According to the ProTeus (PROtein TErminUS) tool [29], the NKLV protein signature is a short linear significant signature in termini of proteins with a corresponding Gene Ontology Cellular Component of "extracellular". Based on alignments available at the Ensembl resource [21] for AQP3 from fish (Danio rerio, Oryzias latipes, Takifugu rubripes, and Tetraodon nigroviridis) and an amphibian (Xenopus tropicalis), the ancestral motifs of the sorting motifs found in human may be NKLL or NMLM (Figure 4). Thus, the presence of the amino acid tyrosine (Y) in this sorting tetrapeptide in the platypus suggests the point in the evolution of AQP3 where the asparagine residue was replaced by the critical tyrosine required for sorting function [30]. The genome of O. anatinus has been proposed has useful for informing human genome sequence and critical link to understanding the differences between avian and mammalian genomes [31, 32]. These observations provide novel evolutionarily insights into the localization signals encoded in the termini of AQP3.

We have used a binary encoding integration strategy to gain a comprehensive view of suggested tissue expression of aquaporins for four organisms. Higher-order patterns in a binary vector space that encodes the presence (1) or absence (0) of feature of interest is an approach for integrating genome-wide numerical datasets [3335]. Several advantages offered by the binary integration of high-throughput gene expression data include computational efficiency and noise resilience [35]. Our matrix revealed that AQP4, in addition to AQP1 and AQP11 were expressed in the brain of all the four organisms. These three aquaporin types are candidates for comparative experimental investigation of aquaporin in brain function. In addition, the analysis delivered a set of body sites in which there was evidence of expression of at least one mammalian aquaporin and chicken aquaporin.

The functions of AQP11 and AQP12 in vertebrate physiology are not completely understood [1, 3]. We observed that AQP11 had the highest number of cysteine residues compared to other aquaporins. AQP11 is expressed in the Purkinje cells of the brain cerebellar [1], a site that have been implicated in the pathophysiology of autism [36, 37]. Exposure of chick embryo to the environmental metal pollutant methylmercury led to reduction in the number of Purkinje cells [38]. Furthermore, there were adverse post-natal behavioral, morphological and biochemical consequences. Mercury ions are known to regulate aquaporin function by interacting with cysteine residues [39, 40]. Interestingly, the first pore forming motif of AQP11 found in Loop B has a motif of NPC instead of the NPA. However, the second motif is NPA consistent with other AQPs. AQP11 is the only human aquaporin with the tri-cysteine (CCC) motif. These observations led us to hypothesize that AQP11 may be a target in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders like autism. We are currently studying the specificity and affinity of a range of cations to further understand the interaction of cations with aquaporins in the function of the central nervous system. With the availability of the chicken genome, the chick embryo has the potential to serve as an important model for the study of the development of neurodegenerative disorders [38, 41].

In the case of AQP12, there was suggested expression in the pancreas of human, mouse and chicken (Table 4) with chicken having the highest expression level. AQP12 is localized intracellularly in the pancreatic acinar cells, the site for synthesis of digestive enzymes [3]. Histopathological studies have confirmed that the highly pathogenic H5N1 virus that causes avian influenza in chicken and other avian species causes multifocal necrosis in the pancreatic acinar cells suggesting that the effect of avian influenza on the function of AQP12 warrants further investigation.

Conclusion

This study demonstrates that the chicken genome combined with a comprehensive controlled vocabulary-facilitated integration of UniGene suggested body site expression can drive generation of hypotheses related to the function of avian and mammalian aquaporins. We describe the generation of hypotheses related to (i) the impact of alternative transcription and speciation on the conservation of functional motifs in human, mouse, rat and chicken aquaporins; (ii) identification of the emergence of basolateral targeting in mammalian species (iii) possibility of cysteine-rich AQP11 as target in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders; and (iv) impact on the function of pancreas-expressed AQP12 during pancreatotropic necrosis associated with avian influenza virus infection.

Methods

Comparison of predicted aquaporin transcripts from human, mouse, rat and chicken

Predictions of genes encoding aquaporins from human, mouse, rat and chicken genomes were obtained from the Ensembl project (Release 50 July 2008) [21] and the Entrez Gene database at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) [20]. In both databases, the human aquaporin information was used as the starting point to extract predicted homologous proteins in the other three species. The amino acid sequences encoding predicted transcripts associated with aquaporin genes in which both an Ensembl and Entrez Gene record exist were further compared. We sought to determine the conservation of functional motifs among predicted transcripts from orthologous genes. Therefore, the amino acid sequence diversity encoded by aquaporin transcripts was determined by multiple sequence alignment of orthologs using ClustalW. In order to visualize the relationship of selected sequences, neighbor-joining tree bootstrapped using 1,000 random samples of sites from the alignment was constructed using the ClustalW software at the DNA Data Bank of Japan [42]. FigTree software version 1.12 [43] was used to view the phylogenetic trees.

UniGene expression profiles for human, mouse, rat and chicken aquaporins

Each NCBI UniGene Cluster contains set of transcript sequences that appear to come from the same transcription locus (gene or expressed pseudogene) as well as other information including expression profile in body sites and developmental stages [20]. The UniGene cluster identifier for each of the aquaporins was extracted from the Entrez Gene record and verified manually. In instances where more than one UniGene entry was associated the Entrez Gene, the unambiguous UniGene entry was selected. The value of the Transcript per million (TPM) for each body site was programmatically extracted from the UniGene Expression Profile Viewer page.

There was need to identify chicken and mammalian aquaporins that were expressed in the same body site based on controlled vocabulary term used in UniGene. Therefore, a 4-digit binary signature was constructed to encode the presence or absence of species aquaporin expression. Thus a matrix consisting of 52-digit binary signature and the number of body sites was constructed and visualized using matrix2png [44].

Declarations

Acknowledgements

Mississippi NSF-EPSCoR "Innovations through Computational Sciences" Award (EPS-0556308); Mississippi Computational Biology Consortium Seed Grant Program; Research Centers in Minority Institutions (RCMI) – Center for Environmental Health at Jackson State University (NIH-NCRR 2G12RR013459); Bioinformatics in Biodefense Career Development Program (DHS-2007-ST-104-000007) and NIH RIMI Grant 1P20MD002725-01 to Tougaloo College. Disclaimer: The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the funding agencies.

This article has been published as part of BMC Genomics Volume 10 Supplement 2, 2009: Proceedings of the Avian Genomics Conference and Gene Ontology Annotation Workshop. The full contents of the supplement are available online at http://​www.​biomedcentral.​com/​1471-2164/​10?​issue=​S2

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University
(2)
Department of Chemistry, Tougaloo College

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© Isokpehi et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2009

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​2.​0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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