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Fig. 4 | BMC Genomics

Fig. 4

From: Phylogeny of teleost connexins reveals highly inconsistent intra- and interspecies use of nomenclature and misassemblies in recent teleost chromosome assemblies

Fig. 4

The gjd2 branch from the compressed tree shown in Fig. 1. This is an example of a group where the structure is considerably more complex in teleosts than in mammals. First, there is one teleost group, here called gjd2*1, that in the majority of statistical models locates closest to mammalian GJD2. Gjd2*1 contains two sequences from most fishes, and each members of the pairs are on different chromosomes in all species (Table 2). Secondly, there are two subgroups (here called gjd2*2 and gjd2*3) that are, according to this statistical model, slightly more distantly connected to mammalian GJD2. In this statistical model, the gjd2*2 and gjd2*3 subgroups have a phylogenetic distribution that is “ohnologically perfect” in that it divides into two subgroups containing one sequence from each species. In all species, the pairs of sequences are found on two different chromosomes (Suppl. Table 7). See legend of Fig. 2 and Methods section for details about naming of the sequences

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